fbpx

NCGS Webinar Library

The following are complete webinar recordings. Click on the title of the webinar to visit that page for online viewing. The PDF handout for the webinar is available for download on the same page.

A complete listing of all handouts, with links, are available on the Member Webinar Handouts page.

Recordings of live webinars will be added to this page, typically two to three weeks after the live presentation.

  • Mysterious RelativesMysterious Relatives
    — Presented by Ari Wilkins — Every genealogist has that mysterious relative – the ubiquitous ‘cousin’ who was always around with no obvious family connection. Learn how to analyze and connect these mysterious relatives to your family history.
  • Navigating Online Genealogy Databases: The Good, the Bad, and the UglyNavigating Online Genealogy Databases: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
    — Presented by Patti Lee Hobbs, CG® — There is no question that online databases have opened doors for genealogists to be able to research their family history more quickly and easily. However, that facility of access brings with it some hidden dangers. Researchers wanting to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard by doing thorough research ...
  • North Carolina Land GrantsNorth Carolina Land Grants
    — Presented by Dr. A. Bruce Pruitt — Land grants in North Carolina were issued by the Virginia Governor, eight Lords Proprietor, King George II and III, the Earl of Granville, and the State. This lecture will discuss these grants that were issued between 1663 and 1960.
  • North Carolina Taxes: People, Places, Time & DelinquencyNorth Carolina Taxes: People, Places, Time & Delinquency
    — Presented by J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA — Discover the variety of North Carolina tax records, and how they can tell you more than the amount due. Learn where they are located, and when to look at alternate sources for information.
  • On the Road Again: Are Your Ancestors Hiding in Road Records?On the Road Again: Are Your Ancestors Hiding in Road Records?
    — Presented by Diane L. Richard, MEng, MBA — Roads were built and maintained by the local community, thus the members of the road crews were appointed by the county court. The records provide incredible insight … at a time when few other records were being created.
  • Online Resources are Key to Successful Research into North Carolinian AncestryOnline Resources are Key to Successful Research into North Carolinian Ancestry
    — Presented by Diane L. Richard, MEng, MBA — Whether devising a research plan for an in-person visit or determining what records are extant and how you can access them, some Internet-based homework will prove valuable.
  • Orphans and Scholars: Genealogical Records Concerning ChildrenOrphans and Scholars: Genealogical Records Concerning Children
    — Presented by Victor T. Jones, Jr — This webinar discusses the four major categories of North Carolina records that focus on children: apprenticeships, guardianships, school records, and bastardy records.
  • Plundering for Genealogical Treasures at East Carolina UniversityPlundering for Genealogical Treasures at East Carolina University
    — Presented by Jennifer Crowder Daugherty — This talk covers the types of resources found in the North Carolina Collection and the East Carolina Manuscripts Collection including family histories, county record abstracts and transcriptions, maps, diaries, letters, personal papers, and more.
  • Post Office Records: Geography, Politics, ReligionPost Office Records: Geography, Politics, Religion
    — Presented by Diane L. Richard, MEng, MBA — Most talks on post offices focus on them as employers — for those seeking to document family members who worked for the post office. Post offices aren’t just about employees or even the mail. Post offices used to define communities and people used their location to ...
  • Pre-1913 Vital Records – Challenging and Elusive and Not Necessarily Impossible to FindPre-1913 Vital Records - Challenging and Elusive and Not Necessarily Impossible to Find
    — Presented by Diane L. Richard, MEng, MBA — Though North Carolina didn’t start officially requiring Birth Certificates and Death Certificates until 1913 (and full compliance wasn’t fully achieved until as late as WWII), it doesn’t mean that you cannot determine when and where earlier birth, marriage, and death events occurred.